The Girl in the Photograph: The True Story of a Native American Child, Lost and Found in America

The Girl in the Photograph: The True Story of a Native American Child, Lost and Found in America

Through the story of Tamara, an abused Native American child, North Dakota Senator Byron Dorgan describes the plight of many children living on reservations--and offers hope for the future.

On a winter morning in 1990, U.S. Senator Byron Dorgan of North Dakota picked up the Bismarck Tribune. On the front page, a small Native American girl gazed into the distance, shedding a tear. The headline: "Foster home children beaten--and nobody's helping."

Dorgan, who had been working with American Indian tribes to secure resources, was upset. He flew to the Standing Rock Indian Reservation to meet with five-year-old Tamara who had suffered a horrible beating at a foster home. He visited with Tamara and her grandfather and they became friends. Then Tamara disappeared. And he would search for her for decades until they finally found each other again.

This book is her story, from childhood to the present, but it's also the story of a people and a nation. More than one in three American Indian/Alaskan Native children live in poverty. AI/AN children are disproportionately in foster care and awaiting adoption. Suicide among AI/AN youth ages 15 to 24 is 2.5 times the national rate. How has America allowed this to happen?

As distressing a situation as it is, this is also a story of hope and resilience. Dorgan, who founded the Center for Native American Youth (CNAY) at the Aspen Institute, has worked tirelessly to bring Native youth voices to the forefront of policy discussions, engage Native youth in leadership and advocacy, and secure and share resources for Native youth. You will fall in love with this heartbreaking story, but end the book knowing what can be done and what you can do.

Title:The Girl in the Photograph: The True Story of a Native American Child, Lost and Found in America
ISBN:9781250173645
Format Type:

    The Girl in the Photograph: The True Story of a Native American Child, Lost and Found in America Reviews

  • Madeline

    DNF at around 50%. I was curious about this book due to the story of a girl named Tamara, whose case fascinated the author, Senator Dorgan. I wanted to learn more about her case, and the injustices fa...

  • Janet

    When it is snowy and cold outside, superspeed readers like me can read 150 - 200+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. LOLI received a temporary digital Advance Reader Cop...

  • Everydayreader1

    Tamara, a little Native American girl was badly beaten and traumatized as a small child. Her story, when it appeared in the Bismarck Tribune, deeply affected then North Dakota Senator, Byron Dorgan. H...

  • Rachel

    I'm sad to give this book only two stars because I believe the content is very important. I had two problems with it: the title and cover advertise a much different book than what it really is. The co...

  • Cheryl

    The book is about a young Indian girl in a picture. What happened to her was wholesale neglect on the behalf of Indian Affairs and the United States government. This book was more about the plight of ...

  • Anna

    I’ve just started this book, and am most incensed at one point. Much talk and deliberation is given to foster homes; where to put the kids, getting more support for the social workers who remove the...

  • Denice Langley

    A direct, comprehensive look at the shocking abuse of Native American people and their resources. Byron Dorgan was a US Senator when he first met Tamara, the girl in the photograph. After reading her ...

  • Judy

    Matter of fact writing style of a subject we are finally putting a face to. The neglect and abuse we have done to the Native Americans. The First Americans. This book, written by a senator, will open ...

  • Beth Postema

    Not a stylistic wonder, but it pulls together so many issues in Indian Country. All of these issues had an effect in one young woman's life, and it's a wonder that she is still living. Dorgan relates ...

  • Nancy

    I have mixed feelings about this book. It spends way too little time on the story of "The Girl In The Photograph" but rather uses it to raise issues related to Native Americans. These issues are real ...